Stop talking about how we should stop talking about The Wire
GQ recently came out with a list of “The New Rules of TV,” and for the most part the piece isn’t more than typical monthly periodical filler - flippant, fluffy and hastily put together. But one of their “rules” particularly annoyed me because it reinforces an idea that has become increasingly common of late despite its stupidity: People only like The Wire to make themselves look good.
Specifically, the heart of the GQ blurb boils down to this quote: “Wire fans don’t just love the show, they love what they think loving the show says about them—which is basically that they are smart, have good taste, and care about black people.” The piece also mentions that it has been five years since the show ended (Five years! Don’t we all know that it’s pointless to talk about anything that didn’t just immediately happen!?) and that The Wire is no longer an underdog struggling to be appreciated, as well as that some idiots try to use the show to pick up dates on OKCupid.
As I said, this is largely a puff piece that should hold absolutely zero weight in the realm of public discourse. But the concept of “UGH, COME ON HAVEN’T WE TALKED ABOUT THE WIRE ENOUGH ALREADY” grates on me, considering I hear a lot more people who make those kind of comments than I hear extolling how The Wire puts them in a state of zen with the African-American inner city experience.
In particular, I hear a lot of opposition to Wire fandom as a deflection from people who have never watched the show before and just don’t want to put any effort into watching it. The GQ writer here isn’t included in that group, but he/she is adding to a well of ammunition for people who just want to dismiss the show as some false messiah of television. In reality, most fans of The Wire like it because it’s a terrific show. It’s riveting, it’s exquisitely made and, yes, we think it actually has something important to say, which I doubt would cause much ruckus if The Wire were a novel or a play or even a movie. But the fact that people react that way to a TV show? Some people can’t comprehend that, and they automatically assume that those who appreciate the show take it too seriously. Those that take that appreciation to the obnoxious extremes of throwing self-congratulatory pick-up lines in their dating profile are the extremes, not the norm.
So for the record, I’m going to go on chatting about The Wire, even if it is a whole five years since the show ended. After all, this is the show that will likely go down as the Citizen Kane of television, and 70 years later you don’t get looked down upon for praising Orson Welles.

Stop talking about how we should stop talking about The Wire

GQ recently came out with a list of “The New Rules of TV,” and for the most part the piece isn’t more than typical monthly periodical filler - flippant, fluffy and hastily put together. But one of their “rules” particularly annoyed me because it reinforces an idea that has become increasingly common of late despite its stupidity: People only like The Wire to make themselves look good.

Specifically, the heart of the GQ blurb boils down to this quote: “Wire fans don’t just love the show, they love what they think loving the show says about them—which is basically that they are smart, have good taste, and care about black people.” The piece also mentions that it has been five years since the show ended (Five years! Don’t we all know that it’s pointless to talk about anything that didn’t just immediately happen!?) and that The Wire is no longer an underdog struggling to be appreciated, as well as that some idiots try to use the show to pick up dates on OKCupid.

As I said, this is largely a puff piece that should hold absolutely zero weight in the realm of public discourse. But the concept of “UGH, COME ON HAVEN’T WE TALKED ABOUT THE WIRE ENOUGH ALREADY” grates on me, considering I hear a lot more people who make those kind of comments than I hear extolling how The Wire puts them in a state of zen with the African-American inner city experience.

In particular, I hear a lot of opposition to Wire fandom as a deflection from people who have never watched the show before and just don’t want to put any effort into watching it. The GQ writer here isn’t included in that group, but he/she is adding to a well of ammunition for people who just want to dismiss the show as some false messiah of television. In reality, most fans of The Wire like it because it’s a terrific show. It’s riveting, it’s exquisitely made and, yes, we think it actually has something important to say, which I doubt would cause much ruckus if The Wire were a novel or a play or even a movie. But the fact that people react that way to a TV show? Some people can’t comprehend that, and they automatically assume that those who appreciate the show take it too seriously. Those that take that appreciation to the obnoxious extremes of throwing self-congratulatory pick-up lines in their dating profile are the extremes, not the norm.

So for the record, I’m going to go on chatting about The Wire, even if it is a whole five years since the show ended. After all, this is the show that will likely go down as the Citizen Kane of television, and 70 years later you don’t get looked down upon for praising Orson Welles.

David Simon hates fans of The Wire
I’ve gotten into a couple minor arguments recently with people about how to “properly” appreciate The Wire. Most of this stems from Grantland’s recent Wire character bracket, which brought out all sorts claiming that such an important cultural work like The Wire shouldn’t be belittled with casual discussion about things like which character is the most badass. I feel this argument is asinine, because while The Wire is without a doubt a work of art taking on tough and serious issues about the structure of American society, it is also an incredibly entertaining television show. It can be appreciated on multiple levels, just like The Godfather or The Great Gatsby.
David Simon sorta chimed in on that debate in a recent New York Times interview promoting former The Wire writer Richard Price’s new show NYC 22, and he seems to disagree - in fact, the impression he gives is that The Wire can’t be appreciated on any level. In the interview, Simon criticizes those who came to the show after it aired, chastising them for not being with the show “in the beginning, or the middle, or even at the end.” Later he goes on to criticize the Internet culture of dissecting TV shows as they go along, claiming that something like The Wire can’t be properly interpreted until there is a beginning, middle and an end - which The AV Club’s Sean O’Neal rightfully points out is blatantly contradictory with his prior statement. More importantly, he discusses how frustrated he gets when people talk to him about their favorite character and miss the fact that this was the story of the city of Baltimore, man.
The idea that Simon insists upon there being right and wrong ways to watch The Wire is already incredibly anal, but the more insulting aspect of the interview is that he doesn’t seem to accept any responsibility for many members of The Wire's fan base not properly grasping his vision.
You don’t like it when people come up to you and say that Omar is cool, David? Well, you’re the one who made him cool. You’re the one who made him larger than life, who wrote actual action set pieces orchestrated to thrill the viewer, who crafted dozens of moments of terrific comic relief. Sure, the conclusion to Omar’s storyline intended to undermine that a bit, but that doesn’t reverse 4+ seasons of a character that was indisputably fun to watch. Basically, if David Simon doesn’t think you should be entertained by The Wire, then David Simon failed as an artist.
I think almost all of us can agree that The Wire is not a failure, so the conclusion that leaves us with is that Simon is a jackass (albeit a well-meaning jackass) with a big mouth. Which is to say, he’s like pretty much every other genius that ever lived.

David Simon hates fans of The Wire

I’ve gotten into a couple minor arguments recently with people about how to “properly” appreciate The Wire. Most of this stems from Grantland’s recent Wire character bracket, which brought out all sorts claiming that such an important cultural work like The Wire shouldn’t be belittled with casual discussion about things like which character is the most badass. I feel this argument is asinine, because while The Wire is without a doubt a work of art taking on tough and serious issues about the structure of American society, it is also an incredibly entertaining television show. It can be appreciated on multiple levels, just like The Godfather or The Great Gatsby.

David Simon sorta chimed in on that debate in a recent New York Times interview promoting former The Wire writer Richard Price’s new show NYC 22, and he seems to disagree - in fact, the impression he gives is that The Wire can’t be appreciated on any level. In the interview, Simon criticizes those who came to the show after it aired, chastising them for not being with the show “in the beginning, or the middle, or even at the end.” Later he goes on to criticize the Internet culture of dissecting TV shows as they go along, claiming that something like The Wire can’t be properly interpreted until there is a beginning, middle and an end - which The AV Club’s Sean O’Neal rightfully points out is blatantly contradictory with his prior statement. More importantly, he discusses how frustrated he gets when people talk to him about their favorite character and miss the fact that this was the story of the city of Baltimore, man.

The idea that Simon insists upon there being right and wrong ways to watch The Wire is already incredibly anal, but the more insulting aspect of the interview is that he doesn’t seem to accept any responsibility for many members of The Wire's fan base not properly grasping his vision.

You don’t like it when people come up to you and say that Omar is cool, David? Well, you’re the one who made him cool. You’re the one who made him larger than life, who wrote actual action set pieces orchestrated to thrill the viewer, who crafted dozens of moments of terrific comic relief. Sure, the conclusion to Omar’s storyline intended to undermine that a bit, but that doesn’t reverse 4+ seasons of a character that was indisputably fun to watch. Basically, if David Simon doesn’t think you should be entertained by The Wire, then David Simon failed as an artist.

I think almost all of us can agree that The Wire is not a failure, so the conclusion that leaves us with is that Simon is a jackass (albeit a well-meaning jackass) with a big mouth. Which is to say, he’s like pretty much every other genius that ever lived.

gumplr:

cajunboy:

touchmeordont:

str8nochaser:

affectionateanarchy:

notesonascandal:

newmodelminority:

daughtersofdilla:

Wendell Pierce to Open a Grocery Store in New Orleans
Healthy Foods in non-rich neighborhoods:

“The store will offer a free shuttle to anyone who spends $50 or more, so they need not walk or take the bus with heavy bags. Each month, the store plans a cookout (which in New Orleans usually means a crawfish boil) to raise money for the community.”

Read more: NYTimes.com







#1 SUIT AND TIE MOTHERFUCKER

gumplr:

cajunboy:

touchmeordont:

str8nochaser:

affectionateanarchy:

notesonascandal:

newmodelminority:

daughtersofdilla:

Wendell Pierce to Open a Grocery Store in New Orleans

Healthy Foods in non-rich neighborhoods:

“The store will offer a free shuttle to anyone who spends $50 or more, so they need not walk or take the bus with heavy bags. Each month, the store plans a cookout (which in New Orleans usually means a crawfish boil) to raise money for the community.”

Read more: NYTimes.com

#1 SUIT AND TIE MOTHERFUCKER

(Source: daughtersofdig, via miketrapp)

NEWS DUMP 3/7/2012
Sorry for our news drought of recent, folks. Just assume nothing happened in the world over the past few days and we can start anew.
Anyway, news dump.
Yesterday’s news: Terra Nova, the show that somehow managed to make dinosaurs boring, has been canceled by Fox after a long period of indecisiveness on its future. It still retains the possibility of another network picking it up, but until then we won’t need to fret about figuring out what the hell a nykoraptor is.
Getting this out of the way: If you don’t like the way The Sopranos ended, then you’re probably just a moron (I’m looking at you, Bill Simmons). Also, David Chase is now mocking you and saying his television masterpiece should have ended like Seinfeld.
Sigourney Weaver has signed on for a new show on USA where she will be playing a near carbon copy of Hillary Clinton.
Our distaste for Showtime’s House of Lies here at DVR Overflow is well documented, and from the brief glimpses I’ve had of the show since its premiere it still seems to be pretty shitty television that largely wastes the talent of Don Cheadle and Kristen Bell. But one of my favorite pop culture critics, Indiewire’s Alison Willmore, makes a compelling case that it paints a more nuanced portrait of race than almost any other show in 2012.
And finally, Grantland has put together a bracket to determine the best character from The Wire. Consensus seems to be that this is the most Grantlandy Grantlandish thing ever, and it truly is the kind of thing that people like Kevin and me would have thought up as a joke at one in the morning at our old college newspaper. But if this thing has to exist, one must say that the seeding is TERRIBLE.

NEWS DUMP 3/7/2012

Sorry for our news drought of recent, folks. Just assume nothing happened in the world over the past few days and we can start anew.

Anyway, news dump.

  • Yesterday’s news: Terra Nova, the show that somehow managed to make dinosaurs boring, has been canceled by Fox after a long period of indecisiveness on its future. It still retains the possibility of another network picking it up, but until then we won’t need to fret about figuring out what the hell a nykoraptor is.
  • Getting this out of the way: If you don’t like the way The Sopranos ended, then you’re probably just a moron (I’m looking at you, Bill Simmons). Also, David Chase is now mocking you and saying his television masterpiece should have ended like Seinfeld.
  • Sigourney Weaver has signed on for a new show on USA where she will be playing a near carbon copy of Hillary Clinton.
  • Our distaste for Showtime’s House of Lies here at DVR Overflow is well documented, and from the brief glimpses I’ve had of the show since its premiere it still seems to be pretty shitty television that largely wastes the talent of Don Cheadle and Kristen Bell. But one of my favorite pop culture critics, Indiewire’s Alison Willmore, makes a compelling case that it paints a more nuanced portrait of race than almost any other show in 2012.
  • And finally, Grantland has put together a bracket to determine the best character from The Wire. Consensus seems to be that this is the most Grantlandy Grantlandish thing ever, and it truly is the kind of thing that people like Kevin and me would have thought up as a joke at one in the morning at our old college newspaper. But if this thing has to exist, one must say that the seeding is TERRIBLE.

News Dump 12/5/11

Good morning Tumblr, and apologies for not posting a News Dump on Friday. We really Britta’d that one pretty hard. Now, to the links!

  • I haven’t had a chance to check out Showtime’s Homeland yet, but the New Yorker’s Emily Nussbaum makes a compelling case for the show, calling it "The antidote for 24”. My God, Jack Bauer has been trying to save the world through brutal torture for 8 days now, and you’ve had the antidote the whole time?!?
  • Speaking of premium cable dramas, here’s a supercut of every opening quote from HBO’s much-loved classic The Wire. I’m slightly surprised at the lack of quotes involving “the game,” but I suppose he hasn’t had a real hit since “Hate it or Love it,” so it’s to be expected.
  • This week, Splitsider looked at notable cases of television breaking the 4th wall. I can’t wait for the followup article, “Television blogs breaking the 4th wall: How DVR Overflow subverted us all by creating a reality show just so they could mention it on their blog and break the 4th wall.”
  • And just for kicks, here’s a little good news for Community fans. The show again improved slightly in the ratings, actually drawing more viewers last week than Parks and Recreation. That’s bad news for Parks and Rec fans though, which, as far as I can tell, are one and the same as Community fans, so we’ll call it a draw.